Omadacycline

(Nuzyra®)

Omadacycline

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Drug updated on 5/17/2024

Dosage FormInjection (intravenous; 100 mg) Tablet (oral; 150 mg)
Drug ClassTetracycline class antibacterials
Ongoing and
Completed Studies
ClinicalTrials.gov

Indication

  • Indicated for the treatment of adult patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) caused by susceptible microorganisms.
  • Indicated for the treatment of adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by susceptible microorganisms.

Summary
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  • Omadacycline (Nuzyra) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible microorganisms.
  • Six studies demonstrated that omadacycline has a similar clinical cure ratio and microbiological eradication rate compared to other antibiotics in treating these conditions.
  • This medication exhibits potential effectiveness against difficult-to-treat infections such as those caused by Mycobacterium abscessus, with 83% of patients experiencing favorable outcomes according to one study.
  • Compared to other antibiotics, omadacycline may be safer for individuals at an increased risk of Clostridioides difficile infection; no reports of this complication were found in phase 3 studies.
  • Despite some adverse events like nausea and vomiting in cases of oral administration, omadacycline had a lower risk of study discontinuation due to adverse events compared to comparators. However, careful consideration of adverse effects is needed when using it for complicated skin and soft tissue infections where its safety profile was only rated as moderate.
  • Studies did not extensively cover subgroup analyses or efficacy across diverse patient demographics beyond general adults with acute bacterial infections; more nuanced analyses would be necessary before providing tailored advice on use within specific patient categories.