Vasopressin

(Vasostrict®)

Vasostrict®

Drug updated on 4/17/2024

Dosage FormInjection (intravenous; 20 units/mL, 200 units/10 mL [20 units/mL], 20 units/100 mL [0.2 units/mL], 40 units/100 mL [0.4 units/mL], and 60 units/100 mL [0.6 units/mL])
Drug ClassAntidiuretic hormones
Ongoing and
Completed Studies
ClinicalTrials.gov

Indication

  • Indicated to increase blood pressure in adults with vasodilatory shock who remain hypotensive despite fluids and catecholamines.

Latest News

loading GIF

Summary
This AI-generated content is provided without warranty and may be inaccurate or outdated, with no liability accepted for reliance on it. Learn more.

  • Vasopressin (Vasostrict) is indicated to increase blood pressure in adults with vasodilatory shock who remain hypotensive despite fluids and catecholamines. It is effective as an adjunct therapy in various circulatory shock conditions, particularly septic shock and cardiac arrest.
  • The study summary was derived from five systematic reviews/meta-analyses related to Vasostrict (vasopressin).
  • In hospital settings for cardiac arrest cases, the combination of vasopressin and methylprednisolone increases the Return of Spontaneous Circulation compared to placebo. However, no significant difference is observed regarding survival rates post-hospital discharge between groups using this combination and those not.
  • For patients suffering from septic shock, vasopressin is a superior adjunct agent to catecholamines like Noradrenaline. It can improve blood pressure more effectively than Dopamine or Dobutamine but may cause digital ischemia at high doses, which necessitates careful dose management.
  • As part of a regimen including other agents such as midodrine and fludrocortisone, vasopressin is beneficial for managing clozapine-induced hypotension in critical care situations; however, vigilant monitoring is required due to its potential adverse effects, including severe hypotension when used with adrenaline.
  • Compared to norepinephrine and novel agents like angiotensin II (AT_2), selepressin, terlipressin, etc., while treating vasodilatory shocks - although there is a lack of definitive evidence supporting its superiority over others - it does show similar efficacy levels concerning increasing mean arterial pressure but also raises safety concerns about possible thromboembolic events or ischemic incidents requiring further investigation.